News

Building internal change capability is HARD!

Posted on May 8, 2014 in News -
Business Consultations, Strategic change implementations

In last week’s blog, we promised to dive into more detail on why building internal change competence is so difficult, and, more to the point, why internal change agents often have such a challenging task.

Building internal change capability is hard because:

  1. Good experiential training is hard to find: In our opinion, there are currently insufficient tertiary level programmes (whether formal or bespoke designed for an organisation) that provide a deep level of theoretical and technical support for internal change agents (by this we mean HR and OD professionals, as well as line managers and leaders who understand how vitally important a deep change competence is to their role function).  A key part of such a programme would be linking change and strategy implementation theory to practice within that client organisation’s specific context.  We can’t stress this enough: The most common concern we hear from internal change practitioners is that they went on an extensive course but on their return to the office were unsure of how to use the tools and skills learnt within their work environment.  [We put this out as a challenge to all tertiary institutions to prove us wrong; if you feel that you do offer such a programme and we are convinced of this, we will certainly sing your praises on this website.  Please let us know who you are in the comments section below.]
  2. Most organisations do not yet recognise change as a strategic imperative and as a result internal change consultants are often not granted access to important information that is vital in order to deliver change at a strategic level.  [Remember, we are not interested in defining change as simply an operational set of tasks that involve training, version control or changing the hearts and minds of individuals.  Change implementation is the full process of designing, structuring and implementing a strategic programme within a business.]
  3. Even where access is granted, influence is often hard to come by.  Most organisations do not have change represented as a discrete skill set at a Board or Exco level, and if we are correct that change is not yet recognised as a strategic skill set and that, often as a result of this, most company executives themselves do not have sufficient awareness and/or training in this regard, the change requirements for the implementation of strategic projects are overlooked.  A seat at the table in order to influence decisions around strategy, its formulation and critically, its implementation, is therefore of vital importance if we wish to turn this situation around.

What is the solution?  We would suggest the following:

  1. As professional change consultants we need to do more to both influence, build and lecture on tertiary level training programmes.  We are committed to this at CCG and have made a strategic decision to step up our efforts in this regard by engaging with local colleagues and universities.
  2. Organisations would do well to appoint professional internal change agents and to build discrete change teams that are comprised of a diverse groupings of influential individuals from across the organisations and representing all levels of the company.
  3. Organisations would do well to appoint change representatives to important strategic forums, even if this presence is on an ad hoc basis in order to influence decision-making.
  4. External change consultants have an important role to play in this regard: Consulting firms provide extensive experience in the field from a range of industries, we can often see organisational dynamics that are hidden or unconscious for employees, and, if we are courageous enough, we are able to speak to these dynamics in a good way in order to build consciousness in this regard and to provide solutions that might resolve these challenges.

This area of practice remains a challenge for all stakeholders.  We would very much like to see improvement in this regard, and believe this is possible if we pool resources and engage with one another in developing more effective practices and approaches.

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Change is Everywhere!!!

Posted on May 2, 2014 in News -
Change consulting and business transformation

We have noticed a significant increase in the interest in strategic change initiatives and the desire of clients to more deeply understand how they might do change better within their organisations and upskill line and support management with change awareness and capability.

There are a number of reasons for this increased awareness: We have become more aware of just how quickly change can occur in the world (a good example of this is 9-11 and the resultant impact on financial markets and their regulation, security awareness at every level of society, military training, readiness and warfighting, intelligence gathering, and the overall connectedness of the entire world in respect of the GWOT), the massive access to data and information that the internet provides and with it the ability to make quicker decisions, the need to make decisions more quickly than our competitors, and, most importantly, the fact that strategic decisions have to be executed more and more quickly and effectively in order to stay competitive (or even in the game!).

It has also been interesting to watch how the word change has seeped in our daily vernacular; examples are US President Barak Obama running his 2008 campaign on a slogan of Change We Can Believe In, and a more recent example of the Democratic Alliance in South Africa running its current political campaign prior to the national vote next week under a Together For Change banner.  Change has become a rallying cry for hope, for the future, for something different.  It seems to swirl all around as a better alternative on the morrow.

If only we could translate many of those wonderful words into effective action!  Regardless of the emotionality of the word change and its underlying promise, at CCG we are much more concerned about how we do change effectively in order to achieve sustainable advantage for a client organisation.  For this reason alone we believe the recent interest in change as a concept, and an increasing organisational recognition of the strategic imperative of change implementation, is an important step forward for the profession.

There are a number of ways in which this interest has been expressed: The level and intensity of engagement with the CCG website, requests for engagement with CCG, and ever-increasing requests to provide change capability building through our Change Learning Academy, to run internal Master Classes for line and support management, and to speak at internal conferences on strategic change and the impact of change on strategy implementation, risk management and optimal line functioning.

A key component of our approach which we believe to be important in this regard is that all offerings are of a private nature.  We do not believe in offering public courses in change, for two reasons:

1. Every client organisation presents with a unique set of circumstances and a unique change profile or signature, and a key reason why change initiatives can fail is because the change methodology or framework used for a previous change programme is reapplied to a different moment in time and to a programme with a different risk profile and delivery requirements.

Key takeout: Change skills development or training (or capability building as we prefer to call it) should be delivered in a bespoke manner for a preselected group of individuals who display the necessary attributes to be change agents within their organisation.  In addition, these delegates should be upskilled using a tailored methodology that takes that organisation’s specific requirements into account, at a particular moment in time.

2. When we have run public change workshops previously and have delegates from various organisations in the room, and sought to drill down in detail to discuss granular aspects of a change programme the delegates were involved with, many clammed up, feeling uncomfortable to share what was often sensitive information at that level of detail.

Key takeout: Change capability building should be delivered to a select group of change agents from a single organisation at a time, who are granted permission to speak openly and freely about their experiences and to share (sensitive) information where this would help the skills development process.

Building internal change capability is an extraordinarily difficult task (which we will deal with in our next blog); in order to get this right, we need to design the appropriate programme, tailored in the right way for a single organisation at a time and in a way that addresses that particular organisation’s strategic change concerns at that specific moment in its history.

Change is very much in the public domain at present: This certainly helps our cause as a change consultants, and for this reason we should be grateful the word has reached mantra status.

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Successful Strategy Implementation

Posted on April 11, 2014 in News -
Cape Town & Australia Based Change Consultation Business

For over a decade, CCG has been driven to understand why up to 70% of change initiatives either fail entirely, or fail to deliver on their intended ROI (John Kotter, 1995; McKinsey & Company, 2006). 

We believe that there are three factors (Leadership, Programme Structure, and Commitment to Clear Outcomes) that are critical to ensuring a successful outcome for a change management programme.  If we can consistently provide solutions to these challenges, the process of strategy implementation would add far more value to organisational stakeholders.

1. Leadership

Committed leadership is the most critical factor to ensuring the successful initiation and implementation of a strategic programme.  At a sponsorship level, and particularly with respect to programmes that are focused on enterprise transformation, it is advisable to have eyes-on, sign-off and oversight from the highest operational structure in the organization (“Exco”).

At the level of strategic programme oversight and decision-making, it is good practice to involve the functional head of the business area accountable for programme deliverables (a GM or equivalent).  This role of Programme Lead typically takes the form of having sight of and sign off of the Programme Brief, chairing the Programme Board, and receiving regular feedback from the Programme Manager.  This structure should ensure an “unbroken line” of accountability from the delivery teams on the ground, through the Programme Board (that has general oversight of and responsibility for, the entire programme), up into Exco.

Questions to ask in this regard are: “Who are key individuals that we should engage with early in the programme initiation phase?”, “How might appropriate linkages be forged between the Programme Board and Exco?”, “How might we ensure that the Programme Lead is able to regularly provide updates to Exco and make requests for assistance?”, and “How do we build a programme leadership structure that ensures we are able to influence all key areas of the company affected by the programme?”.

Key take-out: Ensure that you complete a comprehensive stakeholder analysis during the programme initiation phase and that key influencers are sitting around the table when you kick the programme off.

2. Programme Structure

“Programme management” is loosely used to describe the structure thrown around a programme in order to ensure that deadlines are met within allocated budgets.  A key challenge is determining how much structure is appropriate for a particular programme.

What might work best is to have a high level of structure at a senior programme management level, so that key players like the Programme Lead, Programme Manager, and Delivery Team Leads have a very clear idea of what their day-to-day programme responsibilities are.  Within this arrangement you can then find the flexibility to build appropriate programme solutions as the need arises during the life cycle of a programme.

Questions to ask in this regard are: “Who should sit on the Programme Board?”, “How often should it meet?”, and “How does this entity engage with various programme stakeholders?”

Key take-out: It is important to build the right level of programme structure, which simultaneously provides sufficient organisation to ensure programme cohesion and yet does not stifle day-to-day delivery. 

3. Commitment to Clear Outcomes

A successful programme plan clearly describes the specific goals and outcomes the programme seeks to achieve.   The most effective way to do this is by facilitating a programme planning process at a Programme Board level (all senior level programme members would sit on this structure).  Through this process you would document a set of end-goals for the programme, identify areas of potential risk, and identify where uncertainty or disagreement exists within that organisation that requires resolution before a programme can commence.

Questions to ask in this regard are: “What is the ideal outcome that we wish to see from this programme, and do all stakeholders agree with the answer?”,  “What are the linkages to existing projects/programmes in the business and how might we dovetail with these in order to both share resources and enable outcomes?”,  “What are the timelines we believe are appropriate for the programme and are these realistic?”, and “What are some of the difficult relationships and/or dynamics within our organization that might prove difficult to manage in the context of our programme”.

Key take-out: It is imperative to spend enough time in documenting a Programme Brief that all stakeholders buy into and accept, prior to the start of implementation.  The quality of the thinking we apply at the start of a programme will very often determine the quality of the result that follows.

Conclusion

In conclusion, successful strategy implementation requires committed leadership, appropriate programme structure and documented programme outcomes that are brought together within an integrated programme methodology in order to achieve success.  Change Implementation as a methodology provides a positive response to an area of management studies that has a poor track record and allows us to feel more confident about the future of our professional practice.

Please call us on +27 21 461 0802 to learn more about our proprietary change and strategy implementation methodology System7™.

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Show me the Money!

Posted on April 8, 2014 in News -
business transformation in South Africa & Australia

We noticed a growing trend by clients in the past four or five years to push back hard on consulting fees.  

We understand that most corporate clients are still fighting their way out of the financial crisis.  The fact remains that negotiating a fair contract is critical to the success of a project, and it is in the client’s best interest that this is the achieved outcome of a consulting engagement.  In fact, we would go further and say that it is the fiduciary duty of the executive who signs off on a consulting contract to ensure that they have negotiated a contract that makes sense for both parties.  Let us explain why.

At CCG we are deeply interested in understanding what leads to strategic change initiatives either succeeding or otherwise.  Research done by various parties conclude that at least the majority of change or strategy assignments fail either in their entirety or at least fail to delivery intended ROI (however this is defined).

We believe that a key reason for such a dismal failure rate is inadequate contracting between the client and consulting provider.

Let’s provide you with more detail on this thinking:

1. You get what you pay for in terms of the quality of the firm you hire.  This seems self-evident enough and we generally understand that a less experienced firm would either not be able to deliver at all on a particular assignment (because they might not have experience of delivery on every aspect of the value chain on a particular assignment), or they would certainly not deliver as efficiently as a more experienced provider.  Efficiency is this context refers to time a provider would have to spend in understanding a client problem or challenge, providing a solution to that problem, and then implementing a solution.  And this presumes that a new kid on the block even has the experience to provide all three legs of the stool, which is doubtful.

Efficiency also refers to the impact of fees on the level of incentive to really pay attention to your assignment.  In our experience it takes time to build trust with a client and it is only once a deep level of trust is present that a client will begin to share sensitive information and their real concerns.  This information is critical to consultants in order to build sustainable strategic solutions.

2. If a consultant is selling before listening long and deeply to a client sharing their concerns, then the best we can do is flog yesterday’s solution delivered to a client in perhaps a very different sector (and with very different concerns), and not be present to the current client’s troubles today.

Unfortunately this is a position that (in our view) we are often forced into as consultants, because it takes a lot of courage to tell a new client (that you hardly know, is often anxious to find a solution, and is often not sharing the full story) that they will have to engage in a series of conversations before you can deliver the goods.

Why is this important?

1. We believe we need to change the nature of the client-consultant relationship, from one of arms-length consultant, to close collaboration within a relationship of deep trust within which both parties run a mutual risk of failure (this speaks to the issue of fees and could be the topic of a future blog).

2. Clients need to manage their relationships with consultants more carefully, by engaging with and choosing consulting partners long before the need for their services arise, based on aligned values and a shared concern about a successful outcome.

If we can get these two things right, we believe that we will relieve a lot of pressure from both parties, and ensure a much higher level of successful strategy implementations than the current figures (research shows us that only 30% of such engagements are successful).

One more (contentious) point: It is our experience that clients are increasingly interested in consultants providing implementation solutions in addition to expert advice.  In my view, many of the big consulting houses have steered away from this (more risky) work, and focussed instead on delivering thick decks of well-constructed slides.

As a profession, we will build a lot more credibility, enjoy more satisfaction (and, dare we say it) secure an additional and lucrative income stream, if we are prepared to think through difficult problems, and then make the suggested solutions a reality.

In order to do this successfully, we believe that we need to be willing to invest in building relationships with clients from the get-go; and relationships that are based on rigorous engagement and honest reflection (both ways!).

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Welcome to our new Website!

Posted on April 4, 2014 in News -
Advisory services to corporate clients - Business Consultation

We are incredibly excited to launch our new website!

There are a number of reasons for this:

1. We have grown exponentially over the past 5 years and needed a more comprehensive portal to describe our offering and experience.

2. We wanted to build a seamless environment within which we could engage with our clients, colleagues and fans and provide content in an easy to access format.

3. Most of all, we wanted to build a real portal that supported thought leadership in the fields of change and strategy implementation, and provide a forum within which practitioners in the change and strategy spaces from all over the world could engage with one another, share thoughts and ideas and really work together to improve our service offering and the practice of change management.

We have a tailored message for each constituency that might visit, browse and engage with the site:

For consultants:

Please share your thoughts, comments and own practice in response to the detailed information we hope to provide here over time.  Let’s work together in a real spirit of collegial sharing and with a dedication and commitment to improve our professional practice.  We really look forward to hearing from you.

For clients:

Whether you work with us currently, have in the past or are considering doing so in teh future, this site is of course about marketing our service offering, but it is also a place within which you can share difficult challenges you currently face and receive input from ourselves our our virtual colleagues from around the world.  Please engage with us in the spirit of generosity, this is a place for all professionals who are challenged by or interested in change to engage in a spirit of dialogue and continuous improvement.

Why is all of this important?

  1. We need spaces within which change professionals can engage with one another and with industry about sometimes very complex matters.  Of course the online world can only help us so far in this process, but it is an important start and it is a place where initial thoughts can be shared and tested.
  2. The world is becoming every more complex and interconnected, and the change imperative in our view will only increase with time.  As a result, this is not only a tremendous opportunity for change practitioners in terms of their own careers, but it also throws up enormous ethical and professional challenges, and as change practitioners we need to be mindful of these and respond accordingly.  In the same way, there is an ethical duty on industry employee and leaders to think carefully about the change imperatives that face their own business and begin to develop sustainable responses to these.

Thanks very much for visiting us and for reading this post.  Please pass on to others on your social and physical networks that you feel might be interested and we look forward to responding to your comments!

PS All comments are moderated, please could we ask everyone who contributes to do so in a spirit of sharing, generosity, dialogue and openness to difference.

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Relationships that Work

Posted on October 3, 2012 in News -
The Change Consulting Group

Andy Phillips raised a very important point in a comment to our previous blog entry “Change Doesn’t Work!!!”.  We really value Andy taking the time to respond and the valuable professional point that he raised, and promised to respond in our next blog post.

CCG is very clear that success in our consulting engagements requires deep and trusting relationships with clients.  Our approach is evident from the outset: We state our intention from our first meeting with a new client that we wish to use the time to share our experience in the fields of strategy and change implementation and to learn about their concerns and plans for the future.

This approach is not understood by all: Many clients expect a consulting firm to hard sell a particular solution and to provide expert advice and answers from the get-go.

There are two problems with this approach:

1. In our experience it takes time to build trust with a client and it is only once a deep level of trust is present that a client will begin to share sensitive information and their real concerns.  This information is critical to consultants in order to build sustainable strategic solutions.

2. If a consultant is selling before listening long and deeply to a client sharing their concerns, then the best we can do is flog yesterday’s solution delivered to a client in perhaps a very different sector (and with very different concerns), and not be present to the current client’s troubles today.  

Unfortunately this is a position that (in our view) we are often forced into as consultants, because it takes a lot of courage to tell a new client (that you hardly know, is often anxious to find a solution, and is often not sharing the full story) that they will have to engage in a series of conversations before you can deliver the goods.

Why is this important?

1. CCG believes we need to change the nature of the client-consultant relationship, from one of expert adviser providing arms-length advice, to collaboration in a relationship of deep trust in which both parties run a mutual risk of failure (this speaks to the issue of fees and could be the topic for my next blog).

2. Clients need to manage their relationships with consultants more carefully, by engaging with and choosing consulting partners long before the need for their services arise, based on aligned values and a shared concern about a successful outcome.

If we can get these two things right, we believe that we will relieve a lot of pressure from both parties, and ensure a much higher level of successful strategy implementations than the current figures (research shows us that only 30% of such engagements are successful).

One more (contentious) point: It is our experience that clients are increasingly interested in consultants providing implementation solutions in addition to expert advice.  In our view, many of the big consulting houses have steered away from this (more risky) work, and focussed instead on delivering thick decks of well-constructed slides.

As a profession, we will build a lot more credibility, enjoy more satisfaction (and, dare we say it) secure an additional and lucrative income stream, if we are prepared to think through difficult problems, and then make the suggested solutions a reality.

In order to do this successfully, we believe that we need to be willing to invest in building relationships with clients from the get-go; and relationships that are based on rigorous engagement and honest reflection (both ways!).

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Change Doesn’t Work!!!

Posted on June 6, 2012 in News -
Change Consulting Group Consultants

As we have blogged before, CCG is fascinated with why such a high percentage of change interventions fail. 

We believe there are two main reasons for this:

1. Clients don’t understand the complexity of introducing new strategy into their businesses, particularly large organisations, or are unwilling the make the difficult choices always required in order to embed sustainable change. 

2. Most consultants who work in the space are either not experienced enough to identify and manage the complexity involved with large-scale projects, or are not able to sufficiently influence the client to adopt a necessary approach.

We have a number of comments to make about how to deal with these issues:

For consultants:

If something doesn’t feel right for you up front or you don’t feel readily able to tackle a particular project, pull back.  Either ask for professional support and advice from a colleague or let the project go (as hard from an emotional or financial/commercial point of view that might be).  You owe it to your client, yourself and your collegaues to only do work that you feel confident in being able to deliver on.

For clients:

1. Accept that consultants are considered experts for a reason (if you don’t believe someone is an expert, don’t hire them!).   We have heard too many times that we shouldn’t “over-engineer” our approach to strategy/change implementation, “surely we can do it in less time than that”, “I think your approach is too structured for our organization”.

These remarks make us think about going to a doctor with a pain in one’s chest and arguing about whether we should have open heart surgery (the doctor’s urgent professional recommendation that we don’t want because it costs and hurts a lot!) or rather (the patient’s suggestion) that we take a dose of pills and get some rest.

Why is it that we don’t (generally) argue with the doctor about what he or she recommends as a remedy, but when it comes to change we are all experts!

2. Don’t shoot the messenger: Don’t attack the person delivering the message simply because it doesn’t suit you!  It is important to accept that you won’t like every consultant you meet and sometimes the people we like least have the most to teach us!

Implementing strategy successfully requires that hard choices are made by both consultant and client.  This requires often dealing with difficult organizational politics (for example, between IT and the line, between one executive and his agenda versus the project manager, personality issues between an external consultant and the Project Lead; the list goes on…).  

Why is all of this important?

  1. Managing the myriad of relationships that exist in any large human system requires leadership and patience from all parties, as well as the capacity for honest conversations.
  2. The theory of change management is not complex, the application is extremely so (this is one of the reasons we use the term “change implementation”) and a skilled consultant needs to help a client understand this at the very start of an engagement.
  3. Successful change implementation requires a high level of trust between the parties involved (and “parties” might include dozens of folk who play an integral and strategic role in an assignment).
  4. Both parties to a consulting contract can assure a greater rate of success if they are willing to risk more, earlier in the game.

We suggest testing your relationship from early on (even before contracts are signed) in order to ensure the appropriate level of understanding exists to ensure assignment success.

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Of Titles and Protocols

Posted on May 19, 2012 in News -
Cape Town & Australia Based Change Consultation Business

 

A skilled consultant can learn a great deal from the first interaction with a (potential) client.  Sometimes subtle (and not so subtle!) signals* from a client can be very useful in building an understanding of the client system** and help to inform whether or not we feel we can add consulting value.

A “client” in this context is defined as the organization itself, the company switchboard, the person with whom we have first contact (often a personal assistant or junior staffer, otherwise known as a gatekeeper), or a company executive.

Things that we at CCG take careful note of when first engaging with a new client system include:

1. How difficult is it to contact the Head of Strategy or the lead executive in the area of the business that we would like to engage with?

When we feel we can add value to a particular client and contact them directly and without an introduction or referral, a very common experience is to speak to his or her PA and be requested to submit a brochure or letter of introduction. This is acceptable but note the tone of the person you speak to (are they open, warm, inviting, respectful, or not?)

2. What is the initial interaction with the client executive like?

Are they down to earth, interested in learning, open to meet a consultant that might add to their understanding of their portfolio or might help with company delivery?  In our experience, the very best leaders are constantly looking to improve their understanding, as well as their capacity for outstanding delivery.  This requires input from others, and consultants as experts in their respective fields can be a great source of information and insight.

3. Titles tell us a lot about not only the structure of the company but also what is (unconsciously) valued.

We are always impressed when we meet a Strategy, HR or Marketing Director (a Finance Director is common) and even more so if they sit on the board (this is not always possible or desirable, but often is).  In South Africa, we have only met one Director of Strategic Change.

Why is all of this important?

1. Because consultants can learn a great deal about our potential clients from our interactions with them, and especially before a contract is signed and our focus turns to delivery.

2. Because before we sign that contract we should be very clear that we can add expected (and unexpected) value to the client.

At CCG we believe we should walk away from assignments that we feel in some way undermine or diminish our professional integrity. Or a situation where we don’t feel we could add significant value and ensure our professional reputation is built and not diminished.

3. The consultant relationship should be a collegial one, where both parties are open to learning and can express concerns or uncertainties, and where both parties share the risk of an unsuccessful engagement.

 

*(For more on signals, see the work of Arnold Mindell, a great influence on our work at CCG).

**We refer to “system” a lot and will define this term in future blog posts.  For now, large system strategy or change consulting refers to the skill set required to successfully embed strategy in large/complex organizations.

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“Change Management” a Misnomer!

Posted on May 17, 2012 in News -

At CCG we believe that the term “change management” is a misnomer.  As change and strategy consultants our assignment is to advise a client in identifying and engaging with complexity in their organization.

Change invariably arises as the result of seeking to implement a new strategy in a system (that can be defined as a team, division or entire enterprise).

If an organization demands change because of other dynamics like complaints about leadership or company culture, then you have big problems!  (We will deal with this scenario in another posting).  

By the same token, if an organization is down-sizing (or “right-sizing” in consultant speak) then what employees need is skill development and support in finding alternative employment.  Again, this is not what is euphemistically referred to as “change management”.

Clients usually call when they are presented with big opportunity (launch of a new product/service or purchase of a new company), or when presented by great challenge (market contraction, game-changing introduction of technology that can’t be ignored).

As a result we speak of Change Implementation, which is really the process of helping a complex system negotiate its way around the implementation of new strategy, or Strategy Implementation.

The other reason I=we don’t like the term “change management” is that it usually refers either to a “training” course that is meant to “support” employees emotionally and cognitively through a change process (nothing wrong with this these actions, but only a small part of a larger process); the other use of “change management” is within ICT and here is a reference to a training course on a new hard system (the term we use to refer new IT hardware or software).

Either way, the approaches described above do not take cognizance of the myriad of complex organisational dynamics that might result from the implementation of new strategy.

Examples of “strategy implementation” projects could include a list as varied as the following:

  • Implementation of a SharePoint portal (currently very topical and the type of project we would insist should not sit with ICT alone: there are a number of organizational interactions that should be facilitated in order to ensure appropriate adoption and use of a system as powerful as this)
  • Strategy development of a Digital/New Media strategy
  • Culture change: ensure all areas of the business are included in formulation and roll-out of such a strategy, particularly the line.  Often HR is asked to head up such a project, without sufficient input from business leaders (then we ask why resistance levels are so high!)
  • Strategic Training (We are thinking here of something complex like a training program to build coaching skill on the line: impacts on corporate culture as well as how a company chooses to engage with staff and run its performance management system)
  • Mergers and Acquisitions: this type of process in our view should not be left to financial advisory or HR in isolation.  Rather, an approach that builds an integrated solution has a far higher level of success

In order to address these difficult challenges, over the past decade CCG has developed System7™, a proprietary change and strategy implementation methodology.

In forthcoming blogs, we will speak to aspects of System7™, in order to engage in professional conversation with other strategy and change consultants, and to hopefully add to our ability to be successful in this difficult field.

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Passion for complex organisational change

Posted on May 13, 2012 in News -

For many years we have been fascinated with the fact that 70% of change initiatives either fail in total or fail to deliver the ROI expected (however that might be calibrated).  CCG is the culmination of 23 years of work in the change space and this blog is our attempt to share some of our experience, frustrations, questions and victories with a wider audience.

We are a bunch of straight-talking, no-nonsense people and you might find that our posts follow a similar pattern.  In fact, we believe that as change consultants we are often not direct enough and this can increase project risk (something we will write a lot about in this blog).

We appreciate and request feedback, challenges and professional engagement.

Thanks for visiting our blog!

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